Calling all Gardeners and 1337

Okay, I’m stumped – but before I get to the gardening question, wanted to share a tidbit: this morning a nice little image declaring I’ve received 1,337 likes appeared.  Just how did they come up with that number? If anyone knows the story behind this intriguing number, feel free to share in the comments!

Now on to the real reason why I logged in to post –

What Happens when You're behind schedule
What Happens when You’re behind schedule

Earlier, I shared what beautiful plants appeared when I got side-tracked and didn’t get an area weeded in time – Which has been identified as a poppy.

The poppies have all died back and some even look completely done – so I’m left wondering – is this a perennial poppy that I just need to be careful about what I do around it, but can go ahead and clean this area out, newspaper and mulch around where the plants were?

Or is it a self-seeding annual, that newspaper and mulch will ruin any chances for plants next year?

I’ve perused quite a few gardening sites and can’t find a picture of one that looks just like mine – so if anyone knows an answer or a way for me to determine a course of action, it would be much appreciated!

Here’s pictures of what the starting-to and died back plants look like:

startofdieback

The brown stalk in middle of green weeds!
The brown stalk in middle of green weeds!

Back to Ye Olde Weeding!   🙂

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13 thoughts on “Calling all Gardeners and 1337”

    1. Um…yeah…I have so many (not-so-nice) stories about what the word “elitist’ describes – –

      But, it is what it is and I’ll try not to exhibit the negative aspects of being an elitist (and would love to hear of the positives, cuz I can’t think of a single one! LOL)

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  1. 1337 is the cubed root of Pi divided by whipped cream. Beats the heck out of me why they skipped 1336 !! However congrats on one more post and that they are being liked ! Regarding the poppies – my bet is it is an annual variety. The perennials usually don’t die back completely. As long as the seed pod has dried and scattered the seeds you should be all set for next season’s crop.

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    1. Yum! Whip cream! Love it!
      Thanks for the info regarding the poppies – I shall gently clean and mulch the area they are in, then and wait for next spring! Thanks so much for stopping by – I’m behind on my track-back reading, but can’t wait to get to your site! 🙂

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  2. I believe the poppies will reseed themselves. These are oriental or asian poppies so you might have to specify that when you search. I’ve had California poppies and they reseed themselves. I’ve also saved the seeds for future poppy patches. From the pics I don’t see any seed pods left, so they might have already reseeded themselves. In that case mulch and see what pops up next spring! 🙂

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  3. congratulations on the 1337 likes! thanks wordpress, for such random info! just for fun i did a google search and ‘internet slang’ defines 1337 as ‘elite’. it’s official, tamra jo – you’re a wordpress elite!! : ) aleya

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